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Annual Wildlife Day

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National insect Week 2020 Logo

 

This year our Annual Wildlife Day is part of National Insect Week.

There will therefore be particular emphasis on the insects we have in the garden and the predators that eat them.

Learn why insects are so important for the planet and everything that lives on it - including us!

 

June 28, 2020 at 12:00 - 18:00

Join us for a family day out that is full of activities and information for all the family. Find out about the wildlife we have in this garden – and meet some of our wonderful insects and spiders. There will be plenty of experts on hand to give you top tips on how you make event the smallest of garden wildlife friendly.

Pay on the day

Cost £6 adults and £1 children

Tickets

Wildlife Day 28/06/20 Family Ticket (2 adults and 2 children under 16) £10.00

Who will be here in 2020?

We are delighted that the following people, organisations and activities have already confirmed that they will be at our Annual Wildlife Day in June 2020.

They will be providing a variety of hands-on activities, themed walks in the garden and information for all you keen wildlife gardeners.

We will be adding to this list as we get confirmation.

Can't wait until June? Follow our dedicated Wildlife Day Facebook Page where we post lots of information about British wildlife and wildlife here in the garden.

Ribes 'White Icicle'
Moth trapping
pipistrelle bat
bullfinch web crop
Mini beast hunts in 2014
Hedgehog
grass snake
Looking at the landscape with PLACE
Compost bin
Red admiral butterfly
Dissecting owl pellets

Bumble Bee Conservation

Bees are important to the health of our countryside. They are vital as pollinators and have a key role in the production of our food. They feed on flowers and we see them here on the flowering plants from March to October.

Our garden has many plant species for bees to feed on, so you will see both honey bees, which live in our hives, and bumble bees. Join Alison from the Bumble Bee Conservation Trust to identify the bumble bees in our garden and see which flowers they are enjoying in June.  So far she has recorded 10 species in our garden. Read more

Butterfly and Moth Conservation

Since 2012, David Baker has been visiting the garden regularly to set up his moth traps.

He will be setting them up again the evening before the wildlife day. He will help you identify the moths he has trapped and introduce you to the wonderful and exotic world of moths.

Over the years he has identified over 330 moths in our garden, including some that are very rare in this area, such as the privet hawk moth.

Read more

East Yorkshire Bat Group

There are 18 species of bats resident in the UK and all of them eat insects, so encouraging them into your garden is a good way to control pests.

The East Yorkshire Bat Group carry out research and conservation and offer advice about how to encourage bats into the garden.

They also have bat carers who help rescue injured or grounded bats. At our wildlife day you may be able to see one of these rescue bats.

 

Natural England

Experienced bird-ringer, Craig Ralston, will be back again to record the birds we have around the house and tea room area.

He will be catching and ringing the birds - a vital part of building a picture of changing bird populations. It also means that you will have the opportunity to see of our gardens birds up close.

Birds recorded in the past include this stunning bullfinch, as well as woodpeckers, blue tits, great tits and robins. Over 50 bird species have been recorded here at Stillingfleet. Read more

British Arachnological Society

Join Geoff Oxford, known as the spider man, on spider hunts around the garden.

Find out about the spiders and other arachnids you might see in your house and garden. Learn more about these fascinating animals and you can help in their conservation.

Geoff has written a number of articles for the children's Bug Club Magazine, so you can just keep on learning.

Little Urchins Hedgehog Rescue

We are so pleased that our garden here at Stillingfleet Lodge is viewed as a safe haven for rescue hedghogs. Every year we have a number of 'hogs released here after they have been rescued. Hedgehogs are very much part of our natural pest control as they eat so many slugs and snails.

These much loved animals are in a rapid decline and need your help. Fiona Quick from Little Urchins Hedgehog Rescue will be here to talk about you can encourage hedgehogs into your garden.

Project Wild: CIC

Nic Atherton, the man behind last summer's Selby Eco-Club and all round amazing naturalist is back.

He'll be leading pond dipping sessions, looking for some of the amazing animals that live in our wildlife pond, such as newts, dragonfly larvae and water boatmen.

He is also an expert on reptiles, so he will be available to talk about snakes and lizards too!

People. Landscape and Cultural Environment of Yorkshire

Celebrate and learn more about the natural and cultural heritage of Yorkshire with Dr Margaret Atherden, head of the charity PLACE.

Not only is she a fount of knowledge about the Yorkshire countryside, but she has already told me that she has some children's activities planned for the day.

 

 

 

North Yorkshire Rotters

We have seven compost heaps here at Stillingfleet onto which we put all our organic waste. This provides us with all the compost from the garden.

Learn how you can turn your kitchen and garden waste into a free supply of compost with the volunteers from North Yorkshire Rotters who will be hear all day sharing their tips and advice on all things compost related.

 

 

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust look after over 100 nature reserves across Yorkshire and involved in many more projects. They also have a really useful library of information about how you can help wildlife.

Find out more about their work and how you can support them and help nature in Yorkshire.

 

 

Owl Pellet Dissection

Find out what owls eat in one of the most popular activities of the day. Armed with just a pair of tweezers, you will be able to gently pull apart the pellets and learn to identify the bones inside.

Not only a fascinating insight into owl diets, but also a chance to compare the bones of the different animals they eat, such as voles, mice, small birds and amphibians.